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, there is a budget, and it is well-done. and it has strong deficit reduction and strong investments. it's balanced in a way that the ryan plan is not. it saves medicare where he destroys it. it invests in education and infrastructure, where he destroys that. his budget budget is a wrecking. our budget, you should the able leadership of senator murray, is a path of -- an optimistic path to our future, not a pessimistic, painful plan that mr. ryan has put forward in the name of the republican parliamentarparty.now, you are a filibuster, and it is possible that we could end it, but i will tell you this: we are trying for some friendship and comity across the aisle right now. we want to keep the government open. okay, so the senator from kansas stood here last night and said, the reason he is filibustering -- he never used that word, but the reason he is insisting that we spend 30 more hours, 40 more hours, 50 more hours on this, last year's business, which is last year' year's appropriation, is because he demands to have a vote on his amendment that he feels very strongly about. and it has to do with
and then on the deficit this year, the democrat deficit would be 164 billion dollars bigger than the republican deficit. and next year, 308 billion dollars, just to give you a sense of it, by 2015 the republican deficit would be down to 125 billion and the democrat deficit 433 billion. there's a big indication of the difference between the parties when you look at the budgets of the budget blueprints of the republicans in the house and the democrats in senate and republicans want to restrain spending and democrats want to continue to blow up the budget and eventually, over the decade add 1 trillion dollars of new taxes. >> sean: yeah, so 1 trillionew a trillion dollars, this is like they know no other way, all right? that's point one, but yet, they still will give us almost trillion dollar deficits as far as the eye can see throughout the entire ten-year period. here is the big issue though, i want to see obamacare repealed, but it's not going to happen through paul ryan's budget plan. the republicans, if they want that to happen, to get ryan's plan through, they're going to have to during one of the c
the deficit by meaning don't raise revenue are not serious about cutting the deficit. >> neil: even though we've raised revenue, bottom line. >> we should be willing to close tax loopholes if we didn't have a deficit, if we didn't have debt. it's the right thing to do. >> neil: we raised taxes. >> i didn't say raise taxes, i said close loopholes. republicans call closing loopholes raising taxes because it's the rich that have unfair practice. >> neil: have you filled out your brackets? yes or no. have you filled out your brackets? >> no, i haven't done that. i'm going to leave that to the president. he may be late on that too. >> neil: i'm sorry. thank you very much. >> thank you, neil. >> neil: do you remember this? an interview i said senator paul and senator cruz were whacko birds. that's inappropriate and i apologize to them for saying that. >> neil: after that, senator cruz accepted that apology. is senator rand paul about to do the same? and as nevada mourns the death of seven marines, did their senator blame the sequester? meet the military commander telling harry to say i'm sorry. [ m
that the republicans are a little bit too root canal, a little bit too debt-obsessed, a little bit too deficit-obsessed and don't talk about the economy and jobs, which polls still show are the number-one issue. >> yeah, they've got to go back to reagan and jack kemp to stop acting like consequence at this pated accountants and get focused on what makes this economy grow. and the way you get revenues, not by raising taxes, by growth. if we had normal growth rates, we would get another 4 or 500 billion right off the bat. that's what they should focus on. all a means to an end. on social security, stop coming across that you're going to, you know, do something to grandma and instead talk about the idea, which they haven't, they don't touch it, of having accounts for young people with proper controls where they own the fruits of their labor, not washington politicians. make it positive instead of this -- as you say, root canal, that was more graphic. >> i think that -- i don't want to get -- i want to talk about the corporate tax, but i want to add to this, i think in a sense obama was right. and
policy center, the ryan budget would have managed to actually add $5.7 trillion to the deficit . a close look at the math makes it clear that the ryan budget can't recoup the revenue lost from its tax cuts without imposing large tax increases on the middle class families. the tax policy center was unwilling to speculate on where the lost revenue would come from. in addition to the economic policy institute estimates that e ryan budget would kill 750,000 jobs this year, two million next year and increased gross domestic product by 1.7 percentage points. the priorities of this budget are all wrong. it kills jobs, stifles growth and adds to the deficit. all while making life harder for seniors, women, children and the most vulnerable in our society. the math of the budget just does not add up. simple arithmetic tells you that the only way to pay for mr. ryan's proposed tax cuts for the fortunate few is to eliminate many of the deductions that middle class families count on to pay for housing and health care and to save for their retirement. the ryan tax plan would further burden those who a
down, if i may say. so we are going to have a deficit this year of a trillion 300 billion dollars which is $25 billion a week. it's the worst deficit that we've had, and nobody knows. >> social security is easy to fix. you lift the cap right now if >>> predictions. pat. >> immigration reform passes the house. republicans kill it in the senate. >> eleanor. >>next state to legalize gay marriage. >> what state? >> illinois. >> susan. >> immigration reform is going to run into big trouble in congress. >> really. mort. >> what i think the economy is going to remain >>> i predict that president abi of japan trying to revitalize his economy by loosening its grip on inflation will overshoot. he will go into debt, it will go into debt
. >> let me quote dick cheney, who said ronald reagan taught us that deficits do not matter. dick cheney was wrong. he was wrong then and now. of course deficits matter, but any one of you who supported the bush plans has no right to speak. i helped bill clinton balance the budget and build a surplus. why? because we had good economic times. in good economic times, you pay down the deficit, but reagan and bush did not, and in bad you have to stimulate in the near term, as thank god president obama is doing. we democrats will balance the budget once again. >> paul, which is more important to america's pursuit of happiness -- which is more dangerous, excuse me, than a 357 magnum -- >> in my home you would find 17 guns and no cans of soda pop. i have the right wing position on the giant drink soda thing. i do not like the idea, and i think bloomberg is a fine man, but i do not like government telling us what size to buy today. this one, i am with tucker and most of you. i have the right wing position on gun safety. i have the same position as ronald reagan, who was for a waiting period befo
. it never balances. never comes close to balancing. it claims that it reduces the deficit over 10 years by $1.5 trillion. that is not correct. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonderhat other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. bill: there's a top republican senator now demanding answers from the fbi director after not being briefed on their benghazi investigation for the last six months. four americans died in the assault on the u.s. consulate including our ambassador chris stevens. senator susan collins says she wants some simple questions answered. quote, are any of the suspects believed to be responsible for the deaths of these four americans including ambassador stevens in u.s. or libyan custody? how many suspects in the attacks are still at large? a few other questions after that. virginia republican congressman frank wolf has been fighting for answers in benghazi. he is our guest now. sir, good morning,
. it is balanced in terms of making sure we move to responsibly managing our debt and deficit, getting our deficit down to less than 3% of the gdp, as every economist in the bowls simps simpson, all the gang of six have focused us on doing, but also make sure we make that investments to keep our middle class strong. >> the point of our budget is to make sure that we show that we have a ten-year plan, if we can put it into place, we will get our economy moving again, we will begin to manage our debt, and we will quit doing this management by crisis where every time we turn around, the republicans say they'll shut the government down if we don't cut more. we need to have a responsible plan. that is what i'm putting forward. it's what the democrats are supporting today, and i'm very proud of it. i think this shows the american people with can manage our country wisely. >>> before you go to the floor, i wanted to quickly ask about the assault weapon ban. harry reid has decided not to put it in the gun legislation. dianne feinstein is angry, deeply disappointed, still wants a shot at it. what do you th
, they want to cut the budget deficits and cut defense spending and simplify the tax code and lower tax rates. in a deal with president obama they could get the first four, more deficit reduction, protect defense, the democratic president would get some cover in cutting medicare and social security and they could simplify the tax code by taking out expenditures. they are now saying they want none of those things and also not going to get the tax rates and keep the sequester and not have a deal. i've asked a lot of them to walk me through the reasoning here and honestly never come to an answer i understand a little bit. >> does that mean they're post policy. even some things that seem like constants don't actually a matter them, it's pure politics, just positioning themselves vis-a-vis the president and not interested in a particular outcome for the country? >> i would like to have an answer where that isn't true. i really would. i've been trying to find it. i'm sure part is i'm not smart enough to do so or found the right people to have spoken to them. it's hard to come up with one. we can go
, taxes, spending and deficits. and the notion that they're going to somehow come together, there's really no, no, i guess, carrot for them to go after here. >> and then they go home for two weeks. >> sure. >> and the question is are they going to hear anything from their constituents that's going to move anybody. i don't know. >> i think that they're not. and the best chance that they had to potentially hear about it was with the potential for a government shutdown, which has now been averted. so again, back to this new pace rhine of these big debates over real issues that are kind of going nowhere. and a new baseline that incidentally it's interesting because their stopgap spending bill that was passed yesterday did mark something of a breakthrough in that the appropriators in the house and the senate, the bipartisan leaderships thereof were able to come together and come up with a spending plan that keeps the government solvent and keeps it operating. and so i think that now we are going to see the appropriators get, you know, being able to get together hopefully and work out these, you
, immigration and guns and what to do about the deficit. >> don't forget two other prominent spokes people, the president and vice president. they care a lot about it and have been quiet of late. i expect to see a big push between of two of them before the vote. >> the lack of courage in the united states is asstountounast. >> it's amazing. >> no one is coming to take your gun. no one is coming to take your gun. >> it's amazing. it's amazing. when you look at the fact that we are talking about a simple thing like background checks. people are dying every day. a baby killed in -- >> in pennsylvania. >> in brunswick, georgia. we are arguing about background checks is almost ununbelievable. surreal. >> background checks have 90% of support among the american people last check. >>> senator bob casey of pennsylvania will join us on the set coming up and leigh gallagher and representative rick mulvaney will weigh in. our good friend michael hainey will have a preview of the "gq" magazine. bill karins, what is up? >> schoolhouse are cancelled around baltimore and washington, d.c. a lot of delays.
, will result in 750,000 fewer jobs bn i end of the year. so we say let's tackle the deficit in a smart way, get people back to work and reduce it over a steady period over a period of time and our comes to balance at the same time that the republicans' budget from last year comes into balance. >> on the issue of revenue, i believe your budget has about $200 billion more in revenue than senator murray's budget in the senate. why did you put that in there considering that republicans are so adverse to any new revenue? >> the budget we have in our democratic proposal. if you take it even together with the revenue from the fiscal cliff agreement, is still less total revenue, luke, than was embedded in the bipartisan simpson-bowles agreement. so we have less revenue proposed by that bipartisan group. we couple it with targeted cuts and reforms over a period of time. and if you actually look at the totality of the budget changes we made over the last couple of years, including the $1.5 trillion, we have a higher ratio of cuts to revenue. considering all the revenue than sim spso simpson-bowles did. a
already huge amounts of money and deficit reduction. it's just not appropriate, mr. president. that our military can't train and do the maintenance necessary. these men and women our marines were training there in hawthorne and with the sequester it's going to cut the stuff back. >> can i tell you marine corps officials this afternoon are taking a strong exception to what harry reid implied, saying that this exercise, for example, was planned well in advance had nothing to do with the bucket -- budget cuts, there were no corners cut. >> bill: this is what i object to. reid is exploiting the death of these marines who were just out in nevada because that terrain is similar to afghanistan. they had a mortar. the mortar malfunctioned and blew up. it had nothing to do with the sequester. he exploits this for political gain. that's just awful, is it not. >> let me say one thing. harry has a unique ability to use wrong words at the wrong time. however in his defense he he never ever associated the two of those together. >> bill: wait, we just heard him do that. he said the sequester and this
there is an urge encrisis. on the other hand, we have a washington right now, obsessed with cutting the deficit. a very long-term problem that has been sold and masqueraded as a short term crisis. your book is called present shock. have the hawks used present shock politics? >> in some ways. without time, without real linear time, it is hard to have a narrative. they keep complaining obama cannot really tell a story that's compelled by the american people. we don't respond to stories. where are you taking us? what is the eye on the prize? what ends will justify the means. so we end up in this crisis management. always responding to each thing. being a deficit hawk, we're going broke. we won't be able to pay our bills. that's pretty immediate. what we have to do is, i mean, long term, look toward a more steady state sustainable economic policy rather than always looking toward the next crisis just to get us through moment. >> is that really true though that we don't think in stories anymore? to me stories and story telling are so central to human beings and the way we think about the world, our
, but ultimately if there's any chance at dealing with the debt and deficit, these two, very different philosophies and visions. >> early april, the president comes up with his budget recommendation. a lot of people are hoping all of this will eventually result in the grand bargain, a real deal looking down the road, everyone on board basically. a deal that would avoid, for example, having to worry about raising the debt ceiling end of july, early august. is that at all doable? >> it is possible. i wouldn't go as far as saying doable now. but what i will say, the difference in approach now versus say two years ago when they tried this and it failed and it was, you know, almost the end of the world as the u.s. bumped up against the debt ceiling, the difference is they are going through what we call in washington regular order. everything is done in the open. i think that has lead to a different atmosphere on capitol hill where people know what's going on, they're voting on measures, and they're not waiting to see the white smoke from the white house when the president and house speaker and others ar
have such big deficits, what can we do, pay your social security and medicare you paid into your whole life. we're going to have to rob you on that because bush spent all your money on the iraq war. sorry, sorry we don't have enough money. by the way we'd love to start a war with iron. that could cost a couple trillion dollars. later, we'll rob you even more and say sorry we just don't have any money. by the way yes, it was started by bush and the republicans and yes, a lot of democrats voted for it, because as usual, it doesn't matter who wins the election, you get the right wing policy, no matter what. all right let me bring in experts. catherine lutz is part of the good folks who did that project that we just gave you the stats from, co director of the cost of war project and michael from rolling stone and our own notebook here on current. catherine, let me start with you. so a lot of people will look at those clips and say really, $2.2 trillion. where did you get those numbers from? >> well, we had a team of 29 people working on the in connection and our economists basically added
they trust on spending issues. when asked how our budget deficit should be reduced, a large majority, 65% of people said by cutting spending. when asked to choose between the budgets proposed by each party, most people pick the one more in line with the republican proposal. cutting spending and not raising taxes. but when asked when each party was trusted more, people say that they trust the democrats more. go figure. let's get an amp explanation from charlie hearst, economists at the washington times. so you have this. people seem to like the republican approach. they just don't like the republican label with it. why is that? >> i think a large degree, republicans have been snakepit. largely because of what we have seen over the last couple of years. republicans talking to the media, which is something the democrats have focused on more than anything else. including the ideas that republicans have gone four. voters are far more in line with those ideas. but i would actually argue that republicans least realize that there is a problem here and there is a real disconnect between washingto
deficit and goes before a judge tomorrow. it is stupid moves like this that are keeping cities and agencies like the post office drowning in debt. there is more people involved and not a fix the problem. we just need to get the monitor. that's my "2 cents more," and that's it for tonight on "the willis report." thank you for joining us. don't forget said records show. i'll see you next week. ♪ ♪ lou: good evening, everybody. president obama today reacting to reported, but unsubstantiated claims of the use of chemical weapons threatening the syrian regime led by a dictator. president obama made his declaration during a joint news conference with israel's prime minister. the first day of his first trip to israel as presidents. >> i had made clear at the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. any more horrific gains. i believe that if the regime has lost all credibility and legitimacy. lou: making an effort to assure the israeli people that america has throwback in regards to ending the iranian pursuit of nuclear weapons and that any decision by netanyahu to protect the na
, that's the estimate of what the possible deficits of these programs might be projected out to the infinite future. it's known as the infinite horizon projection. it doesn't tell us anything about the current fiscal status of these programs. it's just designed to create a big scary number as it does. 60 trillion-dollar, sometimes you hear the number 200 trillion-dollar. that's nonsense. real actuaries hate this sort of number because they say it's only there to basically mislead the public, and to scare people into making changes in these programs that they don't need, and that aren't necessary. >> john: indeed. i know we're short on time but i want to get to your fourth lie which i thought was one we hear all the time that you're paying way too much for your benefits or maybe you're paying too little? >> yes this is an in the misrepresentation. they are social programs. some putting more in to them will get more out of them. some won't get much out of them, what they paid in taxes. what makes the programs valuable at the middle of your career or midpoint of your career you
that the obama care would be deficit-neutral and control costs i think has turned out to be a charade. if you look at the longer term projections it looks especially more unlikely today than it did when they were engaged in the budget that allowed it to pass. what i think is interesting on the political side is how republicans are treating the issue right now. there is a debate inside the republican party whether it's wise to continue talking about obamacare. on one hand you have a group that says in effect this is over, this is done, we should tweak it, try to improve it, do what we can. let's not focus op it because it's in the past and discussion of aweer thety. on the other hand people think talk about it all the time because implementation is proving difficult and it will be more difficult as we go along to the republicans' benefit. >> bret: the second group of republicans believe the thing could crater. it could just not work. >> correct. that is a possibility. i think that the comment we just heard, there are thousands of pages of regulation that people haven't read is true. i don't ca
choose. keep the current cuts in place, or get the same amount of deficit reduction by eliminating or reducing provisions in the tax code that benefits specific corporations or wealth year taxpayers. you choose. >> bill: we will give you more choices to make when we come back here with congresswoman jan schakowsky. you choose. >> this is "the bill press show." [ music ] guys that do reverse mortgage commercials? those types are now. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's what you're saying. you would rather deal with ahmadinejad than me. >>absolutely. >> and so would mitt romney. (vo) she's joy behar. >>and the best part is that current will let me say anything. what the hell were they thinking? >> chatting with you life on current.com/billpress. this is "the bill press show" live on your radio and current tv. >> >> bill: how about it 43 minutes after the hour? we are coming to you live from our nation's capitol, brought to you today by the national education associatio
the deficit long term. the democrat budget, of course, talks about a big tax hike over ten years of about $1 trillion. republicans say they're not going to do that. they want to roll back obama care. these are the two outside extreme positions. that's where we're at now. going forward can they come together and find some middle ground? >> weigh in on that, lauren. is there really a chance for reconciling these two extreme budgets? >> i think david kind of nailed it here. when it comes to the budgets, they're just a little bit too far, but this budget process isn't a waste of time. i think it's promising that they went through regular order. this is something that the senate hasn't done. they haven't passed a budget this a long time. i think what we'll see is this may open the door to pass some appropriations bilts for 2014 and this could put us on the road for a long-term deficit reduction deal. these are just opening gothss here. >> david, as i look at your article, it focuses on immigration reform and how it's making its way through the senate. where do things stand right now? >> alex, the
deficit reduction who say this budget won't do it. >> okay, congressman. as you know, house democrats are also out with their budget. joining senate democrats in calling for more revenue as well as spending to create jobs. but paul ryan didn't seem too optimistic about this this morning. take a listen to what he said. >> all the democratic budgets have one theme. more taxes, higher spending, never balancing the budget. if you look at these two budgets, yeah, we're two worlds apart. we're literally on different planets. >> he says you're literally on different planets. do you, therefore, have any hope of a compromise? >> well, not very much with paul ryan. i do believe that as steny hoyer, the himinority whip said he thinks republicans are going to have a difficult time getting votes for this budget. as we remember, the republican presidential candidate in 2012 ran away from the ryan budget which was not nearly as severe as this one is. so he's going to have problems with his own members in the republican conference and on this vote, but, you know, paul ryan is right. we are on very di
step in the right direction. according to the weekly standard after running deficits 350,000 a year for years. the senate hair care center is and according to the sergeant at arms who is responsible for trying out the new model, government subsidized haircuts shaves and shine will be a thing of the past and you the taxpayer will no longer foot the bill for the grooming of your senators. the american taxpayers have forked over 5.25 million dollars for, yes, senate hair care. pretty unbelievable, or maybe not. because we do know how important the perfect haircut is well, to certain senators. remember john edwards? remember this? ♪ i feel pretty, oh so pretty ♪ ♪ i feel pretty and witty and bright ♪ ♪ >> oh, what a classic. that's all the time we have left this evening. as always, thank you for being with us. let not your heart be troubled, the news continues. greta is next and see you back here tomorrow night. greta, take it away. >> greta: this is a fox news alert. an 8th marine has died after a mortar shell explosion during a training accident in nevada. several marines w
deficits and debt. how can you not worry about that. they do seem integrally involved in phobia, a lot of we don't want anybody else coming to this country. >> yeah, yeah, that's -- that's true, chris. it's this idea that they're losing their country. they fear change. they fear -- they're anxious about the change that we see. we see the browning of america. we see, you know, the gay rights movement is preceding at pace. you know, we saw the first female speaker of the house not too long ago. so it's this change that they have a problem dealing with, chris. and let me get to the point about -- >> why would somebody care -- i always wondered about this. why would somebody who is white care about whether the country is white 100 years from now? they're not going to be here. and the people here would be comfortable with it. your nature will change with the country's nature. it does sound like pure racism. if you want the country to be tribally white 100 years from now. i don't know why a black person would care either. why do people speculate the way they think what the country will be li
larks newark, new jersey, washington and detroit have all closed schools to cut budget deficits. and that brings us to education nation. which is part of an ongoing commitment by nbc news, to foster a national dialogue about the future of education in america. today education nation is on the road in detroit with he had nbc's education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> we want to talk about what's happening to the schools in michigan. but in detroit, we can't help but talk about what's happening in the city of detroit. joining me right now is the governor of michigan, rick snyder. and the news of the day is that on monday, your emergency financial manager for detroit is going to go to work. there's a lot of controversy around it. people are protesting, saying it's unconstitutional. that he's going to sell off some iconic pieces of the city in order to balance the budget. what do you say? >> well it is legal. this is a crisis. and we need to turn it around. and if you look at, we've had success with emergency managers. if you look at detroit public schools, they've had one for the
the deficit. you have to have a process. now every package we get has been 11th-hour, crafted by the leadership behind closed doors. it concentrates the power in the hands of leadership and takes at away from the rank and file. take gets you to a place where i did not get everything i wanted, but i get some of what i want it. everybody does not expect to get 100 percent. you did not expect that you are going to get more hundred% adopted. the same is true in congress. they have to reconcile those differences. the only way to do that is still a legitimate process. it has to be bipartisan. somebody is on to say, bipartisanship is not a theory, it is a political necessity. >> i am going to have to ask if we have time for one more question. we have time. you guys are lucky, at least one of you is. inwill get to a microphone one second. would you please come up here. the sandtist and on -- sanford andl don't that society. one of the major concerns in this country is the affordable health care act, and there is a lot of concern about that. i have to ask senator daschle, snowe, and no
for tax revenue to help reduce the deficit. it calls for more spending. we are in the funny process where today, we will wrap up beforehand 50 hours of debate and start the unlimited amendment process. any issue that you have heard complaints about, we might see votes on today. droneld be stuff like strikes against u.s. citizens, it could be taxes and repealing healthcare. the point to remember, this is adding on to a budget resolution. it is interesting and it may give people clues as to what appetites there are in the senate to pass or repeal certain elements of policy. host: the headline says the senate is poised to pass a budget. do you expect it to pass? guest: we do expect it to pass. behink the democrats will able to control the process and get it to pass. they have a small window. you would need vice president biden to come down and break the tie. the significance is, this is the result -- there is a lot of pent up frustration on the republican side. that is why we might see a late night tonight and into the morning. once it is passed, i think a lot of people will feel better and
federal deficits in five years makes it imprudent to jump in with both feet. consider on tuesday paul endorsed a version of immigration reform that would allow the 11 million or so undocumented immigrants in this country to become legal. the week before he defied the hawks in his party to lead a 13-hour filibuster in protest of the obama admission's secretory over its drone war fare program. >> dan senor, you've been involved in republican presidential primaries lately. sorry about that. how would those issues stack up in new hampshire and iowa and south carolina and florida? >> i think the politics, his politics on pure fiscal issues will have tremendous resonance as his father experienced in some primary states and caucus states. i think what is untested is -- from a -- from a political standpoint is his position on foreign policy. his father never really broke through on the neoisolationist politics at the grassroots level beyond a narrow segment of the electorate. rand who i've spent time talking about these issues is much salvier than his father. >> his father blamed in effect u.
-income americans to reduce the deficit. so now, finally, senate democrats feel that they can go ahead and echo that position. that's change. >> an narc the president is expected to release the white house budget in april. what kind of compromises, if any, can we expect to see there? >> i think he is going to kind of come up and say the same things that he has been saying. we will look at the changes he will make to the entitlement program. the republicans saying they will not raise tax and what the democrats might do on entitlement reforms if they can find any kind of common ground that would be possible there. >> bill schneider, anna palmer, stick around. we would like to come back to you later in the hour, if that's okay with you. >> sure. >> thanks. >>> could bill clinton be talking out of both sides of his mouth? the report that suggests escorting two candidates for the same office. we will talk about that. >>> first though, kristen cinema is here, very excited about being here. we just had a 15-minute conversation to make up. we can't talk about that. we can talk immigration, marriage equ
-point deficit to beat the cleveland cavaliers 98-95. they have now won 24 games in a row. >> bill: can you imagine being down 27. >> i mean that's -- in the third quarter being down that much is daunting. but it shows just how dominant lebron james is, when he is ready to turn it on, he turns it on, and there is no stopping him. which is different than he used to be. now he is a monster. >> bill: you have got it. we have a great lineup for you for the rest of the program, congress woman judy chu from southern california will be joining us as well as a friend of bill from the "huffington post" and joe, our own foreign policy guru who will bring us up to date on what the president is up to in the middle east and his syria in fact use chemical weapons as has been reported. and the republican party engaged in a sort of a civil war. we'll get into that, but first -- >> announcer: this is the "full court press." >> espn releasing president obama's complete march madness yesterday as the men's tournament gets underway today. number one louisville, indiana, ohio state, an
in the leadership, which is the deficit of trust between the two sides. but pulling back, they picture, wolf, many israeli critics of the president have said too often he lectures israelis and doesn't seem to understand israel. tonight those critics, man of them, are saying he now feels he has conveyed that he does understand israel in a deep personal way, wolf. >> jessica yellin traveling with the president in jerusalem getting ready to head over to jordan with him tomorrow. jessica, thanks. >>> we're getting new information about claims that syria has used chemical weapons. our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, has the very early results of the u.s. investigation. what is this, barbara? what are we hearing? >> brianna, as you said, the u.s. intelligence community has been working on this problem around the clock. did the syrian regime use chemical weapons. we do now have some initial results of that investigation. with video of syrians suffering from convulsions and breathing problems, and accusations of chemical weapons attacks, u.s. intelligence agencies have scrambled to determine if the
project 1 billion dollar deficit next year. the closures will save chicago $560 million the next decade. >> whether you do this, mike, in chamucla, florida, or chicago, illinois, this is always excruciating tough for parents and kids, but you got to do it if you're going to keep the budget. >> you have to do it to same some semblance of sanity for a big city like that but you get into where are the displaced kids going to go to schools when the schools are closed? are they going to be bussed? most parents would like their kids to go to a neighborhood school and what happens then? that a huge burden for the mayor now. >> totally. sequestration is complicating it even more. we just did a report that head start across the country is facing these exact challenges and cutting school days and not accepting kids and randomly dropping kids from the program and a disadvantage for kids in that economic status. >> you look at the regional and local papers across the country you see endless stories like this. you look at the national programs and turn on the tv news and where is the white house tou
should be used to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply tax, cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. >> reporter: now the senate did not accept the paul ryan house budget. the patty murray budget, the senate plan will probably come up to a vote 2:00 a.m. or so. uma: 2:00 a.m. regardless how votes will go won't there be need for serious negotiations? >> reporter: no question about that the house has a very different version than the senate. the house said they would balance the budget without raising taxes. the senate is doing more spending, more taxes. so our colleague greta van susteren asked house budget chair paul ryan about next steps. >> house passed the budget. the senate is passing a budget first time we've seen that in four years. that's a good thing. the question is now can we start looking for common ground? can we started a advancing toward a compromise? the way we look at this as house republicans. we understand our budget probably won't become law in every great detail but hopefully we get a down payment on this p
. here is the next question. is reducing the federal deficit a worthy goal in and of itself? and 85% say yes. 11% say no. it's not just john boehner who said it's not an immediate problem. paul ryan, the face of fiscal responsibility himself this past weekend on one of the sunday shows said not an immediate problem. so americans have gotten the message that it is a problem and that we should be tackling it right now, even though our lawmakers feel it can be down the road a year, five years, whatever we tackle it. >> brian: our next guest has nothing to at to this subject. so i'll move on. >> steve: he does. he's going to -- >> brian: he's coming out of his chair. solar companies were supposed to boost our economy. now evidence they might be tanking our economy. you remember solyndra that cost american taxpayers more than $500 million. turns out it may have a successor. >> steve: months after opening, the oregon based solar panel company, solo power, is facing layoffs, putting 250 million of our taxpayer dollars in jeopardy. apparently stuart varney, we learned nothing from solyndra. >> n
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
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